Film TreatmentThe basic struct

Film TreatmentThe basic structure of this film treatment is1.TITLE with a logline2.ACT ONE: In the 1st paragraph, introduce your main character, the setting, and the inciting event, or catalyst for the story. Where are they at the beginning?3.Somewhere in the middle of ACT ONE, block out ? THE INCITING EVENT: In conventional structure, there is usually an event that disrupts the life or status quo of the main character or characters.4.ACT ONE usually ends with the main character leaving the normal world behind and embarking on the new adventure or entering the new world, often after initially resisting the urge to act.5.ACT TWO, your character pursues her goal. Act Two is the hardest part to write. But think of every step along the way as a change. She either gets closer to or farther from reaching her goal.6.For the most part, the SECOND ACT is about making your main character move further away from solving the problem. It usually has a dismal end.7.By the END OF ACT TWO there is usually a SECOND ACT CRISIS, wherein the main character hits ROCK BOTTOM.8.ACT THREE is usually a short act?sometimes very short. In act three, the character either overcomes the danger or is destroyed. The couple either gets together or does not.What Is a Film Treatment?A film treatment is simple. You will write your own original movie plot. Essentially, a treatment is a sales device that tells the story of your film in the simplest possible manner. Who is the main character?and what does he or she want?A film treatment is the film?s story, or plot, written in prose form. It?s longer and more detailed than an outline or one-page plot synopsis, and it reads almost like a short story, although it is always told in present tense, describing events as they happen. Begin with your film?s title centered:River of GoldUnder the title, there should be a logline, or one-sentence summary of your movie. A good logline synopsizes your movie?s plot?with an emotional ?hook? to stimulate interest. You can find countless loglines online via Google, but here are a few sample loglines.1. The Fugitive: After being falsely convicted of his wife?s murder, a surgeon escapes custody to find the real killer and clear his name.2. Do the Right Thing: During the hottest day of the summer, racial tensions escalate within a Brooklyn neighborhood.3. Rocky: A struggling boxer finally gets a shot at the heavyweight championship.Under the logline, begin the Film Treatment. Center Act One:Act One:In the 1st paragraph, introduce your main character, the setting, and the inciting event, or catalyst for the story. Where are they at the beginning? Remember: All, or most, stories depend on change.To begin you?re writing a normal movie with a main character, or set of characters, and a plot. This doesn?t mean your story has to lack emotional and psychological depth. The best Hollywood films, from Gran Torino, to Wall-E, Up, and the more independent The Wrestler, depend on emotional depth. And the following discusses conventional Hollywood structure?not Citizen Kane per se.Sample opening: Meyer Levin, 36, is ready to propose to his secretary and perennial fianc?e, Jane Maddow, 24, when he gets called into his boss?s office at their Detroit, Michigan, Ford Plant, and told he has been made manager of a new plant opening in Calcutta, India. You see how we have a simple character sketch, and then leap right into the catalyst for change. Structurally, we are set up to wonder how this move will change Meyer? Essentially, this is a classic fish-out-of-water plot.The Tom Hanks movie, Cast Away, for example, introduces us to a FedEx executive, shows him as likable and good at his job, and then proceeds to create sympathy and worry when he must leave the woman he loves at Christmas to fly off in dangerous weather.Somewhere in the middle of ACT ONE, block out ? THE INCITING EVENT: In conventional structure, there is usually an event that disrupts the life or status quo of the main character or characters. Maybe a woman is leaving her job late when a body is thrown onto the roof of her car. Maybe a man is arrested for a murder he didn?t commit. Maybe a student coming home from a frat party is abducted by aliens. Some students have written really creative inciting events; once, an international student in a summer section, had a couple attend couples therapy, only for the therapist to present the couple with a ?new drug? that made the husband wake up in the wife?s body, and the wife in the husband?s body; this is a classic ?body swap? plot, like Freaky Friday has. After the characters and world are established, the inciting event simply sets the plot in motion. This is the game-changer. Essentially, your movie is the series of events and actions that occur as a result of your main character attempting to deal with this new problem. Thus, if he has been kidnapped, there are attempts to escape. If a woman?s daughter was killed, she is now trying to hunt down the killer. The story will almost write itself; why can?t she use the police? Etc.The Three Act StructureBreak your story into Acts. Aristotle?s formula is still worthy. Conceive your film with a beginning, middle, and end. In the first draft, write it in three long paragraphs and focus on one thing: change. Here are a few things to consider. ACT ONE usually ends with the main character leaving the normal world behind and embarking on the new adventure or entering the new world, often after initially resisting the urge to act.ACT TWO: One Step Forward, Two Steps BackIn Act Two, your character pursues her goal. Act Two is the hardest part to write. But think of every step along the way as a change. She either get closer to or farther from reaching her goal. Often, for every step forward, he or she will be knocked two steps backward.Consider Splash. A man is spinning his wheels in the dating scene. He has a memory of seeing a mermaid when he was a little boy. He gets drunk one night, asks a cabbie to drive him to Cape Cod, and meets the girl, now grown. They fall in love. So ACT TWO will have romantic scenes and relationship problems. Like most relationships, they will have moments of closeness and then moments of distance. For example, there is something odd about her. The woman won?t say where she?s from. They fight. They make-up and then, uh-oh, he finds out she?s a mermaid, and the couple is captured by the government?how do they escape?For the most part, the SECOND ACT is about making your main character move further away from solving the problem. It usually has a dismal end.By the END OF ACT TWO there is usually a SECOND ACT CRISIS, wherein the main character hits ROCK BOTTOM.1. In Despicable Me, the girls are taken away from the criminal mastermind.2. In The 40 Year Old Virgin, the virgin?s love interest rejects him. She starts making fun of him as though he is a dangerous freak. The character ends up chasing his would-be conquest through the streets after having admitted his issues.3. In Hustle and Flow, the pimp?s rap tape is thrown into the toilet, and he is arrested.ACT THREE is usually a short act?sometimes very short. In act three, the character either overcomes the danger or is destroyed. The couple either gets together or does not.Places Where to Get IdeasIn truth, nothing is very original, so here are some common places to start.1. The News: Think about everything from The Social Network to Senator John Edwards?s recent affair, or General Patraeus?s recent affair, or the rapid rise and fall of Republican candidate Herman Cain, or the situation on the ground in the Middle East; the news is an unlimited idea factory. Citizen Kane is essentially the life of William Randolph Hearst told slightly askew.2. History: Lincoln?Argo; Zero Dark Thirty?need we say more? While for this assignment you don?t want to adapt a book outright, there are so many tiny episodes in history that would make great movies.3. Take a classic plot and flip it: Wicked takes The Wizard of Oz and tells it from the perspective of the witch; there is a novel that tells Gone with the Wind?s plot from the perspective of a slave on that plantation. If you go this route, be creative.4. Your life: Unfortunately, life can be tough; people say write what you know, and most of the stories student writers base on real life are dramas?classic stories include rough divorce and custody battles, coping with death and disease, but these stories can often be terribly uplifting. Perhaps you do know of an on-again, off-again relationship with a happy ending. Think about the people you know, and you may realize that person has essentially been in a plot.5. Think Genre: What haven?t you seen in a romantic comedy? What haven?t you seen done in a western or war film?Closing Notes: at simplyscripts.com, you can find many screenplay and treatment examples.ORDER THIS ESSAY HERE NOW AND GET A DSICOUNT !!!!Category: Essay Writing

Our group of high quality writers are ready to help you with a similar paper within a specified deadline. Just click ORDER NOW and provide us with your assignment details, contact information and make payments. You will get periodic updates on order progress in your email.

USE THE CALCULATOR BELOW TO GET THE QUOTE

Type of paper Academic level Subject area
Number of pages Paper urgency Cost per page:
 Total:
« »